Paranormal Yakker with your host Stan Mallow

Click on Austin Shippey photo below to view video Interview



Season 1 Episode 13

Austin Shippey. Alexandrian Witchcraft Practioner.
Austin Shippey is a practitioner of Alexandrian Witchcraft, an expert about numerous ancient magical arts, and has written a number of books with paranormal themes. In his interview with Stan Mallow, The Paranormal Yakker, Austin explains what attracted him in the first place to Alexandrian Witchcraft, the history of it, and how it differs from other branches of witchcraft. He speaks about the ceremonial magic of the grimoires and the difference between a grimoire and The Book of Shadows. Austin also talks about the books he has written. This includes his most recent book, 3 Short Stories Based On Dreams. He explains what the book is about and what inspired him to write it. He also talks about his debut novel, The White Room, and his book, Praesidium: A Handbook of Magical Defense and Protection.

Transcript of video Interview

Stan Mallow
Hi everyone. I'm Stan Mallow. Welcome to "Paranormal Yakker." My guest on today's show, we'll be yakking with is Austin Shippey. Austin is an expert on ancient magical arts. A practitioner of Alexandrian Witchcraft. And has authored a number of excellent books. Austin Shippey, welcome to "Paranormal Yakker."
Austin Shippey
Thank you for having me. I'm excited.
Stan Mallow
Great. I very much look forward to this as I told you a few minutes ago. Now, this is a feedback question related to Alexandrian Witchcraft. Here goes. What exactly is it? What was it about it that first attracted you to it? And how does Alexandrian Witchcraft differ from other forms or branches of witchcraft?
Austin Shippey
I first found myself being drawn to witchcraft when after I was first stepping into spirituality. I started reconnecting with my psychic experiences that I had as a kid. And I wanted to improve my experience of the spiritual world and bring myself more into the spiritual world. I felt like there was something around me that I couldn't fully see. I felt like my scientific exploration of the world ended in a dead end. And I'm just crazy enough to go right over the edge of the dead end into the darkness. And so, I decided to plunge into occultism and witchcraft and magical practice. And I found myself very good at it. So, it was something I needed to pursue. And I needed it to be a part of my life. And being able to find brotherhood made it possible to where I could get exactly what I needed to take it to where I could go. And Alexandrian Witchcraft is a brotherhood, a line, a lineage and order. It's a religion and a priesthood. The main purpose of it is to keep alive, pass on, and make use of these very abilities and powers that in our modern day very easily disappear. And a lot of people can't comprehend them. And they're intangible in a lot of ways. So, Alexandrian Witchcraft, like any other organization or a society is meant to preserve that. That's largely what witchcraft has become in the modern world when it sprung forth after the spiritualist revolution began. After the Witchcraft Laws were repealed. It sprung into the world as container for the psychic magical arts. It still is that today. It's still seen that the witch is the person who holds those arts. And they may keep them completely secret. Or they may put them out for the world to see. Alexandrian Witchcraft is a little different than a lot of witchcraft in that it's initiatory and private, but it has a big public presence. And we're not afraid to have a public presence, and be public representatives even when it leads to a bit of chaos or turmoil or drama . But, so witchcraft is alive in the world today. Alexandrian Witchcraft is just one form of the practice. So, that's how I found myself there. That's what, that's the basic definition--
Stan Mallow
Quite interesting, Alexandrian Witchcraft is. Now Austin, I'm sure you're aware when it comes to witchcraft, there're a lot of misconceptions about it. Much of it being perpetrated by certain folks who have their own agenda and making witchcraft look bad. Could you set the record straight by addressing those misconceptions. And explain why they are wrong?
Austin Shippey
Sure. There's so many misconceptions though. So many misconceptions. I was just reading earlier an old blog post I had entered, where I was talking about the reality of the witch persecutions in early modern Europe. And how they relate to persecutions and racism and mistreatment of people even in our modern day. The same phenomena repeating. There's so many misconceptions about witches. And for a long time the misconceptions were centered around anything that they would say about small group that holds little power in the bigger overarching structures. So, you can see witchcraft as being maligned intentionally by powerful systems over the course of 2000 plus years since the Christian church came into Western society and took over. The psychic magical arts and the powers that are channeled through the feminine lunar forces have been. Early on the template was set that those were evil in the Abrahamic faiths. We can even go back to the idea of Lilith. The powerful woman who takes charge and who is seen even as a witch in a lot of interpretations. It's that power that the church mainly has turned into a form of fear. So, witchcraft has to be in this modern day. It has to be a secretive type of society or small practice. It isn't adopted by most of our society these days. In ancient Greece and ancient Rome and ancient Egypt, all of the ancient world magic was just a part of daily life. In a lot of the ages, that was such a positive thing for culture and society and for people. And other times it was horrible. And I think there really is flaw in patriarchal religious systems that cause a lot of hatred to start brewing. And a lot of oppression in bad times. And the hatred and oppression leads to maligning things. I think even if you go into the witch persecutions happening in Africa, which I think they should give different names to. Because it's a different phenomenon. Different time period. Different culture. But it's still people are giving it the label of evil. But it's for a lot of people, many, many people across the globe it's not seen as evil. It's seen as just another source of power. And something that adds a lot of beauty to people's lives. And the modern witchcraft revival is all about trying to give that interpretation instead of the, the one that came from persecution.
Stan Mallow
I thank you for that answer. You're a very good advocate for witchcraft. And a lot of people out here, like I said, have all these misconceptions and you put it straight. So, I thank you for that. Now, of the various ancient magical arts you studied, practiced and mastered. Which ones do you feel have proved to be most useful, most beneficial, most helpful in your everyday life?
Austin Shippey
There're a few. One thing that I find kind of miraculous is all the elemental planetary, zodiacal cabalistic hierarchies that magicians talk about. And structures. The more you incorporate those into your life, suddenly your brain starts to rearrange and become more organized. And it makes you a much quicker, more wise person. And after you've been involved in that for a long time, you start to realize that people who have never been exposed to that, don't think as well as initiates and magicians and people who study these ancient things. It's really like the ancient people's. It's kind of crazy that people these days don't realize that they were tapping into something real. The cabalistic planetary structures. I have a little pill container with it has each of the planetary symbols for the day of the week. I focus on the angels of the days of the week. Work a lot of planetary magic. I focus on and teach about the elemental, the four elemental categories and combined to spirit. The classic pentagram. The four elements. I teach about that in my correspondence course for ceremonial magic. Aside from reorganizing your brain to fit these ancient organizational structures, I think the most useful is like astral projection and astral skills. Because when you have a better understanding of your surroundings, you can use that for the smallest little things. I'll go to bed for example, and I'll think, oh, where did I put that receipt? Or something. And then I'll scan around the house and I was to be like, oh, it's on the kitchen table. Little things like that. Just being able to locate and move around. Move around your consciousness within your consciousness. Those are really cool skills. And these are so paranormal. Inseparable from paranormal supernatural reality. But they're also so founded in science and just psychology. So, those are the most useful things to me. And I think that a lot of people don't have very good visualization skills. So, they couldn't even begin to tap into a lot of these things. Now we look at screens all day. So, we
Stan Mallow
True.
Austin Shippey
don't have to visualize too much. I think we should be reading more books.
Stan Mallow
And hopefully some of yours which we will get to. That's for sure. Now, in your opinion Austin, do you feel that witchcraft can be compatible with other belief systems? And that they can live side by side in harmony and with respect for each other?
Austin Shippey
It depends on the belief system and what the belief system centers around. I think witchcraft centers around and has to be contained in a certain area. Which is why a lot of the rituals are done at night. Moon is out and are focused around the moon. It has to be contained in one area. When you get to solar, it becomes a different thing. And when you go over to things that are too solar, often they don't want anything to do with magic. So, it is sometimes shouldn't be a part of everything. I don't think any type of witchcraft or mystical beliefs should be involved with any form of government or huge powerful structure. I think it should be kept smaller and localized. I think witchcraft could be compatible with modern day huge religions such as Buddhism, Christianity. But I think they might need to do a kind of remodeling of the whole structure to make that happen. And to make it fit in. And if they already don't have a very strong magical system in their religion, it could end up not making a whole lot of sense. And I don't see those big structures changing anytime soon. So, I think witchcraft will stay as an art for the few.
Stan Mallow
Now, you offer training and courses on the ceremonial magic of the grimoires. Later on I will let my viewers know how they can avail themselves of your courses as well as your books. Which we will also discuss. But for now, can you explain why a grimoire is? And the difference between a grimoire, and let's say, a "Book of Shadows?"
Austin Shippey
I think of grimoires as books, or manuscripts or manuals that instruct someone in magical rituals or processes. So, just simple containers for a magical process. They outline them. The description of the magical process. And I think what makes a grimoire really a grimoire, rather than a parable or a holy text is that there has to be a experience that comes through behind it. So, a grimoire is kind of a portal into another world. And that's why a lot of people open them up and start getting scared. And start having nightmares, and don't trust them because it's opening them up to things that they've not experienced yet. And they might not be ready to experience. So, a grimoire is kind of a book that describes how to do magic with certain keys and passcodes to experience that magic. And I think you have to work with all grimoires. You have to do the rituals and practices in them in order for you to start understanding it. I've never really thought about like, what do I think a grimoire actually is. It's kind of like a computer program manual. I think I can compare it to that, but spiritual. Now, the "Book of Shadows"
Stan Mallow
I see.
Austin Shippey
is similar. But, the "Book of Shadows" is a type of grimoire. It's specifically meant for the survival of witchcraft into the modern world. So, it's passed on, and then it's burnt. And this is the way it's always passed on. It's copied from the teacher and handed on to the student. And so, that's a very sacred thing that you only get to experience a certain amount of times in your life. It's so, just like a grimoire, it has an experience behind it. And it has keys and passcodes to get into these other realms, and tap into those energies. But with the "Book of Shadows," it's purposely the "Book of Shadows" because it's not like the other grimoires. It's blank. There you can't read it unless you've been given certain information. There's some versions that have been published, and some documents that have leaked and gone online. And there's PDF forms of them. People are like, ah! So that's what the Alexandrians and Garden Aries and initiates basically are doing. But it's not. It's the "Book of Shadows" is a skeleton. It doesn't have any flesh. It's, and all grimoires are kind of like that. But the "Book of Shadows" is even more so. It's supposed to disappear and be nonexistent. Because there real practice of witchcraft has to be taught and handed down. It can't be written down in a book. So, I think it's just a very clever occult manuscript. The "Book of Shadows."
Stan Mallow
You have written three wonderful books Austin. And I would now like to talk with you about them. The most recent book you authored is "3 Short Stories Based on Dreams." What is the book about? And what inspired you to write it?
Austin Shippey
So, "3 Short Stories Based on Dreams" is started out because I have had really vivid dreams for a while. And really complicated dreams. And I've also been a writer for a while. I started writing my first fiction book senior year of high school when I was 17. And that same year, I wrote the first story in this book. Based off of one of my dreams. Wrote it for a play. So it was this little quick play in three parts where it follows a guy going through his daily routine. And then it ends with his night. And so, it brings you through his psychological state through that whole time. So, it's like you're dreaming in his place. And then it turns into a nightmare. And then so, over the years I had two other really vivid dream nightmares like that. And I, so I wrote all of them down and made them into full stories. Then I was just thinking like, well, when am I gonna publish these stories? And what am I gonna do with them? And then suddenly the dream book popped in my head. So, it starts out with those three stories. And then I surround the three stories with everything that I know, and have experienced around dreams and paranormal experiences. I try to make the dream world and the physical world inseparable in the book. So, it's like the book is half dream, half real. And the reason I wanna do that is because I know that dreams are supposed to teach us. And if people in our society aren't having very many dreams. And if people don't care about their dreams very much in our society, I need to be the dream man and put them through those dreams so that they'll think about these things. I want the stories to scare people. And I want the book to scare people and shake them up. And maybe give them a nightmare .
Stan Mallow
Okay.
Austin Shippey
If they did a nightmare after reading it, then that's my work is done. Because that's just, I want to bring dreams into the real world.
Stan Mallow
I know how strong you feel about dreams coz in ancient times, so people went to gods and goddesses to interpret the dreams etc. And you're very strong with them. And I agree with you on that. Why do you think people have got away while it's only a dream? You know, a casted off. What it really is, have meaning in it.
Austin Shippey
Mmh. So much meaning. And there, I think of dreams as... I can't think of the things. There's a concept of a thing where you zoom in, and it's the same. And then you zoom in and it's the same. And it repeats over and over no matter how zoomed in or how large you get. I really can't remember the name of those things. But that's what dreams are like. They're organically formed. Every level is playing off the same ideas. I'm just trying to say that they're complicated. And that the symbols go really deep. And I'm writing down those dream stories. I still like just a couple weeks ago, was rereading one of the stories, and I was realizing more of the symbolism that I hadn't realized before. Dreams are really complex down to the very detail.
Stan Mallow
"Praesidium: "A Handbook of Magical Defense and Protection," is another book you wrote. What situations can people defend and protect themselves from? And what methods do you recommend they employ to accomplish that?
Austin Shippey
Curses and magical illness and spiritual illness. Attachments. Even possession and exorcism. All of these things have always been around. "Praesidium" brings it into our era. Our day. And it's very, I was reading this other book just as I've been reading this. "The Dark World of Witches" by Eric Maple. It was funny because I've never read that one before. But I was, he's talking about the cunning folk and how they would heal. And that there was the witches in the forest who would supposedly curse. And those were the evil ones versus the good ones. It's funny. His perspective is from our modern society. Very Christian mind's mind frame. Very anti-pagan. My book "Praesidium" is like the opposite. I'm coming from a pre-Christian type of pagan witchcraft perspective. And so, he's saying, "This is what the witches were doing." All the evil stuff. And I'm saying, "This is the technology witches have "to protect ourselves." But I also talk about how witches were accused of cursing royalty. And supposedly trying to bring down oppressors. Competing with the huge political systems basically. And that's dangerous if you're in the persecution times. Because then, that's why the witches were killed. Because they were seen as real potential threat. But "Praesidium" is bringing that mind frame into the modern day. And making it kind of rational. And teaching people how to do it. So, it's a grimoire because if you go through all the rituals, you basically have a really good understanding of all of the energy that I'm talking about. So, it's a short little grimoire that protects you. Sorry.
Stan Mallow
Good. Your debut novel was "The White Room." What motivated you to write the book? What is the theme of it? And what was the creative process you used in writing the book? Coz the first book has to be difficult. I would think you have to go into so many different areas. What order did you put it in? What are you gonna say? What don't you want to say? How do you express yourself? And it's a book you should be very proud of Austin. But I would love to know
Austin Shippey
Thank you.
Stan Mallow
the creative process for that first book.
Austin Shippey
I think it first started when I was a little kid. Probably like, maybe 10 years old. I had this idea like, what would happen if scientists locked someone up in a room, and never let them experience anything? What would our minds be like? What is the empty mind like? And like, what does that mean? And then I learned senior year of high school that there was, that that question had been answered by feral children. Incidences of feral children. Kids who were locked up by their parents. Or who were left out in the wild. And they didn't have any, they didn't have the proper socialization growing up to be well adapted to the society. And I think it definitely called out to me. Because I felt like my childhood should have been better. And I wasn't fully pleased with everything I had experienced. But, it led me to the question, what would it take? And like I was coming from a very psychic mind frame. I wasn't super spiritual at the time, but I was very psychic and empathic. And so, I was coming from that perspective in writing it. The perspective of a child who basically have the worst ever happened to him . The isolation. And then on top of that, an extreme type of brainwashing treatment. Similar to like in "A Clockwork Orange." So, was to answer all of those questions for myself. Go to those dark places and find the light side of them. And the creative process was I knew it would be the same amount of chapters starting at zero ending at 21 I believe. The Major Arcana of the Tarot cards. So it's divided in chapters like that. It follows a progression. And I basically knew the where it needed to start and where it needed to end. I filled it in dividing it by 21. So, even at 17, I was pretty magically minded.
Stan Mallow
And you mentioned the word, empath. I've got to ask you this. What's it like for an empath to look? Close off people and things coz you're very sensitive, and pick up on so many things around people. How you do it when you are around people, and you're picking up, maybe their negativity or their problems. Or whatever it is. Coz I know so many empaths. They say they loved it. Saves you the more they have to get out of it. Breathing the fresh air. I'm always curious about people like yourself who have that. I would call it a gift. Be it some people may not. But you have that. It's part of you. How do you handle? How do you control it? Coz sometimes it could be quite overwhelming I would think.
Austin Shippey
You're totally right about all that. And the way I handle it, it's funny. One way that I've kind of handled it is, for a while I haven't worn my glasses that I need to wear. Because I like lost them and broke them. And I'm just too busy. Finally I'm gonna have glasses again. But I realized whenever I don't have glasses, I can't see very many people. Like on the street. And when I get glasses, I can see their faces. And I can see all of their emotion and suffering and happiness. And it can get very overwhelming. And I think a lot of psychics and empathic people end up becoming very tough. Because they just realized that they are more aware of things. More so than other people around them. And so, you just have to get tough, and kind of close yourself off to some of the emotions and feelings coming from around you. And if you don't get tough, then it can take all of your time. You just have to find a way to balance. Be able to give back and use your gifts for something without it destroying your life.
Stan Mallow
Yes, I was wondering how you was with you, coz obviously you had it. You knew that at a very young age. And when you're young, you're going through all kinds of things in your life. And now you have to deal with this also. That's just like a edge to it. And you're here you say it.
Austin Shippey
Yeah.
Stan Mallow
So, I guess you came out okay.
Austin Shippey
Yeah. Well, towards the end of high school, I was thinking like, okay. The only job that I'm possibly gonna get is, and be good at is these spiritual things. As well as like expressing them in various art forms and media forms. So, I started doing that and setting up booths at the psychic fairs. The local psychic fairs. That I'm so glad that I did that, because if I wouldn't have, and I would have not known about psychic fairs, and would have gone and got a job at like Walmart or something, I don't think it would have been very good for me. I think it would have been really bad. I might not be here. And I mean that in all seriousness. Like being able to have my psychic and spiritual abilities and perspectives verified by other people and validated. It meant everything. It changed my whole existence.
Stan Mallow
And I think it's great that you knew this at a relatively young age. You didn't waste that many years on that. You knew you have a craft
Austin Shippey
Yeah.
Stan Mallow
and you're headed right for it. So, I compliment you on that. Coz so many people I know
Austin Shippey
Thank you.
Stan Mallow
Who have the gifts you have, years and years and years and dozens of jobs that pay well, but they hate. Go by and then they realize, well, I should be there. So, you were definitely our future. So, I wish you good
Austin Shippey
Thank you.
Stan Mallow
With that. Now, should viewers of the "Paranormal Yakker's" show, want to order any of your books. Learn about your ceremonial magic of the grimoire's courses. Or find out about any other projects you may be involved with. How do they go about doing it? And I really would like to promote you. And I know a lot of people in our audience are quite curious in what you have to offer. And that would be just for them. So, if they wanna contact you, please say how do they do it?
Austin Shippey
You can reach out to me on any of my social media. And if you go to austinshippey.com, S-H-I-P-P-E-Y, it will have links to all my social media in the top right hand corner. And I also have tons of stuff on there for people to explore. I want people to have a really kind of amazing experience when they find all my social media. I hope it brings them into my world.
Stan Mallow
Yeah. Well, you did do a great job coz I went on it. I fascinated on all of them. And I could see why you put things down in writing. You have a very good way with words. And you have a great mind. So, and you share it. Coz I've been finding out if you did or not, a lot of people who have the gifts, and there is non of all as you are. I'm not very quick to share it with others. You are very open in sharing. So, I compliment you on that.
Austin Shippey
Thank you. I try to, I've always wanted to be famous. I've always wanted to have people see my work and respond. And be able to make things that people enjoy. Because I feel like I have something to say. And I feel like I can say it in 1000 different textures, and colors and patterns and words. So, I need to continuously be saying that. And if I can make money and buy myself a nice house. And maybe buy my mom a house, that's even better. So I'm, that's what I'm aiming for.
Stan Mallow
Austin Shippey, I thank you for being my guest on "Paranormal Yakker." I very much enjoyed yakking with you. And I wish you well. Abundance of success with everything you do. You will accomplish what you want.
Austin Shippey
Thank you. I'm accepting it and multiplying it. And I'm multiplying it right back at you. More success.
Stan Mallow
Thank you.
Austin Shippey
More
Stan Mallow
Thank you.
Austin Shippey
good.
Stan Mallow
Great. And I hope that when you write other books, and have other projects, you'll be my guest again. I thoroughly enjoyed
Austin Shippey
And I will.
Stan Mallow
being with you. Thank you.
Austin Shippey
I enjoyed it too. Thank you. Thank you for having me on.
Stan Mallow
Hi everyone. I hope you enjoyed the interview you just watched. So, you don't miss any upcoming shows. Be sure to subscribe to my YouTube channel. I would love for you to join me, and my guests. As I work with them, on "Paranormal Yakker."